January 2015
Swank Health: Your monthly news from Swank HealthCare


Swank HealthCare


In This Issue

Did You Know?

Workplace Safety

Top List

Most common causes of injuries that resulted in days away from work in hospitals

What's Going On?

HealthCare Service Excellence Conference (HCSEC)
American Organization of Nurse Executives Conference (AONE)
National Rural Health Association Conference (NRHA)

Now Trending

Workplace Safety

Recommended Readings

Recommended Courses*
  • #40115 Safety Storm Alpha 2015
  • #40215 Safety Storm Beta 2015
  • #40315 Safety Storm Gamma 2015

* course numbers may vary by facility


View Courses

New Courses

Expired Courses

Listing by Discipline

Did You Know?

Workplace Safety

If you pay attention to national news, then you’re probably familiar with the recent harrowing rescue of the two New York window washers who ended up dangling on their platform outside the 69th floor of One World Trade Center when their rigging malfunctioned. At 827 feet in the air, images of the scene were so terrifying they took your breath away.

For many, just the idea of working hundreds of feet in the air every day on a small platform held by ropes is just plain nuts. Why would anybody consider a job like that? But, do you know where most workplace injuries happen in the U.S.? You might think oil drilling or construction, but more workers are injured in healthcare than any other industry. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were approximately 670,000 nonfatal cases of injury and illness in 2013 in the combined private and state healthcare and social assistance industries. Injuries in ambulatory facilities accounted for about 135,000, nursing and residential care facilities about 185,900, social assistance almost 68,000, and hospitals recorded a whopping 276,200 nonfatal cases.

When employees are injured the consequences are high, not only for the worker, but for the hospital, co-workers, and patients as well. Injured workers suffer physical pain and often long-term disabilities. Hospitals spend thousands of dollars on workers’ compensation claims, additional costs for overtime, temporary staffing, or replacements. Worker injuries that lead to turnover can affect patient health and safety. When hospitals are understaffed due to worker injuries, other workers are often required to work overtime, which is associated with worker fatigue, injury, and stress. These are tied to higher risks of medication errors and patient infections. High patient to nurse ratios are associated with an increase in overall medical errors and lower patient satisfaction.

OSHA and other safety organizations recommend a proactive, collaborative injury and illness prevention program to find and fix workplace hazards before employees are injured or become ill. There are six core components that all programs should have:

  1. Management leadership
  2. Employee participation
  3. Hazard identification and assessment
  4. Hazard prevention and control
  5. Education and training
  6. Program evaluation and improvement

OSHA, The Joint Commission, and other agencies require employers to inform employees about hazards in the workplace through regular training and other methods. Swank HealthCare’s Safety Storm Courses include a variety of workplace safety training modules to educate staff on ways to prevent the most common types of illnesses and injuries, such as: Back Safety; Slips, Trips, and Falls; Bloodborne Pathogens; Fire Safety; Hazardous Materials; Workplace Violence; Hazardous Energy, and Latex Allergies. These courses are available in various formats to meet diverse learning needs and achieve maximum compliance. Content comes ready to use or may be customized to incorporate a facility’s policies and procedures and other organization-specific information. For more information about ways Safety Storm and other Swank HealthCare courses can help your organization reduce workplace injuries, call 1-800-959-4248.


What's Going On?

HealthCare Service Excellence Conference (HCSEC)

February 23-25, 2015
Hilton Long Beach – Long Beach, CA

More Information »

American Organization of Nurse Executives Conference (AONE)

April 15-18, 2015
Phoenix Convention Center – Phoenix, AZ

More Information »

National Rural Health Association Conference (NRHA)

April 14-17, 2015
Marriott Philadelphia Downtown – Philadelphia, PA

More Information »


If you have our Full CE/CME Program, you will have a new discipline premiering this month – Athletic Trainer!
If you have an abbreviated package you must call your Account Manager to receive this new discipline.


Top List

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, these are the most common causes of injuries that resulted in days away from work in hospitals in 2011.

  1. 48% - Overexertion and bodily reaction. This includes motions such as lifting, bending, reaching. They often relate to patient handling or how workers are often compelled to put their own bodies at risk to prevent a patient from falling.
  2. 25% - Slips, trips, and falls. These often result in sprains, strains, bruises, and fractures.
  3. 13% - Contact with objects. This happens when workers fall onto, are pushed into, or bump into furniture, walls, or equipment. Bruising, cuts, and punctures are common with these injuries.
  4. 9% - Violence. In 2010, healthcare workers were victims of approximately 11,370 assaults.
  5. 4% - Exposure to substances. This could include exposure to harmful chemicals or infectious disease pathogens. Many of these types of injuries and illnesses go unreported.
  6. 1% - All Other Causes

Now Trending

Workplace Safety

See how much you know about workplace safety. Are these statements a myth or fact?

Myth or Fact

The most common types of worker injury in hospitals resulting in days away from work are cuts and punctures.

Myth or Fact

The most common cause of hospital workplace fatality is transportation incidents

Myth or Fact

In hospitals, Registered Nurses have the highest rate of injury resulting in days away from work.


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Answer

Myth 54% of injuries are sprains and strains. Only 3% are cuts and punctures.

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Answer

Fact Between 2003 and 2011 there were 96 reported worker fatalities due to transportation incidents and 76 due to violence.

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Answer

Myth In 2011, there were about 420 reported injuries to Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants per 10,000 full-time employees (FTE), and about 128 for Registered Nurses. The second highest rate of injury includes Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics at 371 per 10,000 FTEs.

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