October 2014
Swank Health: Your monthly news from Swank HealthCare


Swank HealthCare


In This Issue

Did You Know?

Identifying Levels of Employee Engagement

Top List

Top 10 of the most effective drivers of an engaging workforce in the U.S. health care industry

What's Going On?

HealthCare Service Excellence Conference
American Organization of Nurse Executives Conference
National Rural Health Association Conference

Now Trending

Test your employee engagement knowledge by answering these questions.

Recommended Readings

Recommended Courses*
  • #38710 Improving Organizational Performance
  • #315814 / #16014 Teamwork and Leadership: Healthcare Professionalism
  • #38911 Dealing with Disruptive Behaviors

* course numbers may vary by facility


View Courses

New Courses

Expired Courses

Listing by Discipline

Did You Know?

Identifying Levels of Employee Engagement

When it comes to employee engagement in healthcare, there is no shortage of evidence that shows a positive correlation with highly engaged employees and patient outcomes. We know that the negative effects of a poorly engaged workforce are deeply detrimental, not only to patients, but also to the organization’s bottom line. Now, more than ever, organizations across the U.S. are heavily invested in efforts to improve commitment of their employees. Experts agree that high performers should be recognized and rewarded and underperformers must improve or be asked to leave. But, to act on this premise, managers must know how to identify the level of engagement of their employees. According to The Gallup Organization, there are three categories: the actively engaged, ambivalent, and actively disengaged.

Actively Disengaged

Actively disengaged employees are easy to spot. A Gallup Business Journal article calls them “cave dwellers” because they’re “Consistently Against Virtually Everything.” They’re not just unhappy, they’re actively working to sabotage the organization’s goals and tear down what their engaged co-workers are trying to build. They often form groups that support, reinforce, and spread their negativity. They make up about 12% of the workforce. Other common characteristics include:

  • Complaining – nothing is ever good enough
  • Know-it-all attitudes – they claim to have all the answers
  • Gossiping – they destroy morale and thrive on creating strife
  • Selfishness– they rarely go out of their way to help others and never go above and beyond
  • Make excuses – they don’t take responsibility for their own actions
  • No initiative – they always wait to be told what to do and then complain that they don’t need to be told what to do
  • Reject new ideas – they reject new strategies and stifle enthusiasm for new ideas
Actively Engaged

On the other end of the spectrum, actively engaged employees work with passion. They drive innovation and are champions when it comes to moving the organization forward. Research shows that about 29% of employees fit this description. Here are a few ways to spot an actively engaged employee.

  • Can-do attitude – they exude positivity and will give 100% to accomplish goals
  • Ask thoughtful questions – they seek to understand the organization’s goals and how they can help meet them
  • Share ideas – they’re always looking for ways to improve and are eager to share new ideas
  • Persistence – they stay focused on the big picture and don’t let set-backs or naysayers deter the mission
  • Generate enthusiasm – they work with passion and inspire others to follow suit
  • Go the extra mile – they volunteer for extra work
  • Take initiative – they put innovative thinking into action without being asked
  • Team player – they put the team’s needs ahead of their own and are always willing to lend a helping hand
Ambivalent

Ambivalent Employees make up the largest population of the workforce at about 59%. They are committed to their jobs strictly as a way to earn a paycheck. They feel their life begins when work ends. They are often heavily influenced by their peers. If surrounded by actively engaged employees, they tend to become more engaged, and become more disengaged when surrounded by actively disengaged employees. To identify an ambivalent employee, look for these traits:

  • Give minimal effort – they do what they’re assigned, but rarely volunteer to do more than they have to
  • Modest aspirations – they’re content with their jobs, but aren’t always eager to learn and grow
  • Resistance to change – they’re slow to support new initiatives and base their level of commitment on how much extra time and energy are required
  • Modest enthusiasm – they’re rarely cheerleaders, but don’t tend to be chronic complainers either
  • Clock watchers – they usually arrive on time, but are may tend to sneak out the door a little early at the end of the day
  • Reluctant to share new ideas – they often have good ideas, but won’t share them unless specifically asked
  • Distant relationship with management – they show little interest in building a professional relationship with their bosses

What's Going On?

HealthCare Service Excellence Conference (HCSEC)

February 23-25, 2015
Hilton Long Beach – Long Beach, CA

More Information »

American Organization of Nurse Executives Conference (AONE)

April 15-18, 2015
Phoenix Convention Center – Phoenix, AZ

More Information »

National Rural Health Association Conference (NRHA)

April 14-17, 2015
Marriott Philadelphia Downtown – Philadelphia, PA

More Information »


Recommended Readings

Swank HealthCare provides the ability to upload unlimited custom content in the LMS


Top 10 List

According to research published by Towers and Watson titled, Employee Engagement and the Transformation of the Health Care Industry, here are 10 of the most effective drivers of an engaging workforce in the U.S. health care industry:

  1. Leadership shows a sincere interest in employees’ well-being
  2. There is a healthy balance between work and personal life
  3. The organization provides career-planning tools, resources, and training
  4. Employees understand how their jobs contribute to the organization achieving its goals
  5. Managers treat staff with respect
  6. Leadership demonstrates trust and confidence in the job being done
  7. Work groups have adequate staff to do their jobs
  8. Employees understand the organization’s business goals and steps needed to reach them
  9. Managers encourage new ideas and ways of doing things
  10. Leadership acts in ways consistent with their words

Where in the World is Swank HealthCare?

Featured from left to right:
Kay Gatti (Swank HealthCare), Thomas Klopack (CEO, Skylight Healthcare Systems),
Background: Kevin Meek (CNO, Arizona General Hospital)

Kay Gatti- Skylight Healthcare’s 8th Annual Client Conference October 13-15, 2014

Swank HealthCare joined Skylight Healthcare at “The Del” for their 8th Annual Client Conference. The Skylight team put on an engaging and productive event again this year, allowing their Partners and Clients to network and brainstorm ways to improve the utilization of the Skylight System. Swank plays an integral role in the Patient Experience delivered through Skylight by supplying Hollywood’s finest movie content to keep patients relaxed and entertained throughout their hospital stay. For the staff, who play a role in every patient’s experience, Swank delivers HCAHPS Performance Improvement eLearning content to instruct all employees from front line to senior leadership on evidence-based techniques to improve patient perceptions and achieve higher patient satisfaction scores. The Conference presented the Swank team with the opportunity to network with industry thought leaders and medical centers on the forefront of the patient experience, and learn about the challenges faced by healthcare providers and the solutions we can create, together.

To learn more about the HCAHPS Performance Improvement Series, please request a demo or call 1-877-227-0325.


Now Trending

Test your employee engagement knowledge by answering these questions.

Question 1

At hospitals where employees feel they have career advancement opportunities, access to supplies and equipment to do their jobs, and that leaders are strongly committed to quality, patients are _____% more likely to recommend that facility to family and friends.

A. 4%
B. 8%
C. 11%
D. 14%

Question 2

According to a 2004 Gallup Q12 survey, which of the following items received the lowest score for nurses?

A. My supervisor or someone at work seems to care about me as a person
B. In the last year, I have had opportunities to learn and grow
C. My fellow employees are committed to doing quality work
D. I have the materials and equipment I need to do my work right


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C. 11%. (According to a Towers and Watson survey of 21 acute care facilities in the U.S.)

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D. Many nurses don’t feel they have the resources they need to do their jobs.

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Monkeypox - Other high-priority bioterrorism threats include: Botulism, Smallpox, and Tularemia.

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